A Look at Rear Extension Roofing Options For Your Home

  in  The Home
A rear extension may not seem like the most appealing option for revamping your home's living space, but it is an excellent way to increase available room by as much as 50%. While there is a wide variety of roofing materials and designs, this articles aims at considering two options for roofing for house extensions:
  • slate roofing for rear extensions
  • metal roofs for rear house additions and toppers (this is an option if you're not adding onto your property)
In deciding roofing for house extensions, the following factors should be considered
  • type of roofing material
  • cost of roofing materials and services of professional roofers for installation
  • type of rear extension (partial or full)
  • aesthetic requirements (do you want something traditional like slates, contemporary with metal sheets, etc.)
  • amount of space being added
General Considerations
Generally, extension roof needs to provide protection from sun, wind, hail etc., while allowing moisture release through its perforations.

The rear extension will need a roofing material that is waterproof, durable and able to withstand the weather. Terracotta tiles are not recommended for rear extensions as they have an uneven surface which means water can easily pool on them but it's perfect in areas where there is no risk of snow;

Tile roofs will have to be laid with pitch at least 30 degrees off horizontal so that rainwater does not flow over the edge onto walls or ground below thus causing damage. The available space will determine if this type of roofing can therefore be applied.

Choice of Materials
The choice of materials will have an impact on both the initial build price as well as ongoing maintenance and repair work. With regard to material for roofing for house extensions, many people opt for slate. Slate roofs are more expensive than tile but provide better insulation from heat loss; this is good if you live in a region with cold winters. Metal panels are often used when adding onto prebuilt properties because they don't require digging up any gardens like say shingle roofs do - meaning that there'll be less disruption to what's already there. On the other hand, it is important to note that slate roofs are heavy so it's not a good idea to put them on top of an extension if you plan on moving in the future. Also, slate tiles can crack from frost damage (which is more likely when close together) or leaking water could seep through gaps between slates into your extension below after some years of use.

Metal panels are often used when adding onto prebuilt properties because they don't require digging up any gardens like shingle roofs do, meaning there'll be less disruption to what's already there.

Aethetics
With regard to aesthetic and house extensions, metal roofing is aesthetically pleasing on its own but in addition to this, they're also a good material for house extensions as their appearance will blend into what's already there more than some other materials might.

Slate roofs on the other hand are aesthetically pleasing for house extensions, but because they'll be visible from the back of a property, their appearance might clash with what's already there.

Cost
The rear extension is usually expensive. The high installation cost required for rear extension means that you'll need deep pockets if you want one installed onto your property. This includes paying labour charges at rates much higher than those paid by normal builders and labourers employed by them specifically for rear extension work only which renders rear extension the most expensive type of construction work. This doesn't only cover installation costs but also includes all other expenses such as purchasing rear extension windows and doors, hiring a roofer to install rear extension tiles or slates, renting scaffolding for rear extensions that are higher than two storeys in height etc.,

Slate roofs are more expensive than tile but provide better insulation from heat loss - so good if you live in a region with cold winters.